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 ENTRETENIMIENTO: Los orígenes de Winnie-the-Pooh infographic
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Original de mapa de Winnie-the-Pooh de 1926 en subasta

07/07/2018
Graphic News

July 10, 2018 -- El mapa original ilustrado de The Hundred Acre Wood, incluido en las primeras páginas de “Winnie-the-Pooh” de A.A. Milne, se subastará en Sotheby’s en Londres. Se espera que se venda por unas £150.000. Saldrá a la venta con otras cuatro ilustraciones de E.H. Shepard.

Disney’s “Christopher Robin” fantasy comedy-drama movie is released on August 3.

The map is described by auction house Sotheby’s as “probably the most famous map in English literature”, E.H. Shepard’s original 1926 sketch introduced readers to the world of Christopher Robin and his friends, Pooh, Eeyore, Tigger and others, in the original book.

The map also played a starring role in the Disney film “The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh”, animated as part of the movie’s opening sequence.

The map will go on sale with four other Shepard illustrations, one of which shows Christopher Robin and Pooh saying their goodbyes, while the others feature Eeyore, Rabbit and a game of Pooh sticks. None of the images have been seen in public for nearly 50 years.

The map illustration was first sold by Sotheby’s in 1968, where it fetched £650, before the auction house sold it again to a private collector two years later for £1,700.

Philip Errington, Sotheby’s senior specialist in printed books and manuscripts, said there was growing collector interest in illustrations, particularly by Shepard.

In 2014 an original ink drawing portraying the characters playing Pooh sticks sold for £314,500, a record for any book illustration sold at auction.

Christopher Robin, a new film based on Milne’s characters, is due to be released by Disney in August.


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